As a little kid I wanted to be an explorer when I grew up. National Geographic, that hallowed institution famous for its yellow-framed magazines, with photos and stories from unimaginable lands and cultures, played a huge role in framing my wildest dreams about exploring this planet. So when the National Geographic Weekend radio show, hosted by the legendary Boyd Matson, contacted me about being featured for the Cycling Silk expedition, I was pretty much on the moon with excitement. A dream come true! The show aired on January 9th, 2012, but I've only now figured out how to excerpt and feature the interview. Check out my National Geographic debut below:

Kate Harris on National Geographic Weekend radio with Boyd Matson. 

In other exciting news, I was also featured recently on the CBC! Which as a similarly hallowed institution, certainly in this country, is enough to make any Canuck worth their maple syrup feel chuffed. The fabulous Mark Forsythe of the CBC's BC Almanac interviewed me about the Cycling Silk expedition and my plans to write a book about it, a show that aired on November 29th, 2011. You can listen to that interview here:

Kate Harris on CBC Radio with Mark Forsythe.

In other news I'm working on the Cycling Silk book like it's my joy, my dream—and my job. My boss overseeing this particular gig (ahem, yours truly) is absolutely ruthless, demanding overtime hours with no pay on nights and even weekends, in working conditions eerily similar to those described by Shackleton in his infamous (though possibly miscredited) advertisement seeking volunteers for a polar journey: "[woman] wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in event of success." So however doubtful a safe return is, I'm aiming at success in the same way that Shackleton aimed his team at Antarctica—though unlike his crew, I'm hoping to avoid getting stuck fast in sea ice in the process. Whatever happens, it promises to be a wild ride in words...

"The craft or art of writing is a clumsy attempt to find symbols for the wordlessness. In utter loneliness a writer tries to explain the inexplicable. And sometimes if he is very fortunate and the time is right, a very little of what he is trying to do trickles through - not ever much. And if he is a writer wise enough to know it can’t be done, then he is not a writer at all. A good writer always works at the impossible.”
-John Steinbeck, from a Paris Review interview 

 

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AuthorKate Harris