Alison Criscitiello admires The Explorers Journal edition whose cover she graces (along with Rebecca Haspel), feeling very relieved (or maybe that's just me?) to be in a warm cozy home and not skiing up that godforsaken/gobsmacking/glorious river in the Pamir Mountains, near the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan.

Alison Criscitiello admires The Explorers Journal edition whose cover she graces (along with Rebecca Haspel), feeling very relieved (or maybe that's just me?) to be in a warm cozy home and not skiing up that godforsaken/gobsmacking/glorious river in the Pamir Mountains, near the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan.

Nothing like returning from one adventure (a wee winter cycling jaunt above the Arctic Circle) to find a previous adventure showcased on the cover of The Explorers Journal. This is the official magazine of The Explorers Club, a society dedicated to "the ideal that it is vital to preserve the instinct to explore," meaning it's a club after my own heart. I pretty much fainted when I saw my name on the cover next to John Glenn (you know, just the first American to orbit the Earth), and Ed Burtynsky (a haunting, visionary fine arts photographer who manages to make us to look twice at, rather than flinch from, the industrial messes we've made of our planet).

As an undergrad student I went on a pilgrimage to The Explorers Club headquarters on East 70th Street in Manhattan and dorkily posed for photographs in front of the door, dreaming of someday going through it. I initially got in as a Student Member of the Club (highly recommended, young explorers!), which came with the opportunity to volunteer at the riotous Explorers Club Annual Dinner, a chance to escort Sylvia "Her Deepness" Earle from the VIP room to her seat at the gala and eat scorpions. Sylvia was lovely, the scorpion, not so much.

Before scorpion appetizer.

Before scorpion appetizer.

After scorpion appetizer.

After scorpion appetizer.

This is all to say that I'm honoured to land in The Explorers Journal alongside so many of my adventurer/scientist/artist heroes. Inside the issue you'll find photos from and a short essay about the Borderski expedition (soon to be a documentary film!), which was made possible by the Scott Pearlman Field Award. And I'm proud so say that I've since become a Fellow International of The Explorers Club, as thankfully a taste for predatory arachnids wasn't a prerequisite for membership.

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AuthorKate Harris

Ever wondered what it's like to sneak across Tibet with your best childhood pal in the guise of androgynous Chinese cyclists? To test the limits of sanity, friendship, nations, and an inadvertent ramen noodle cleanse while pedaling for ten months through ten countries, many of whose names end in 'stan'? To set off for Mars, determined to be a modern-day explorer, and end up—marvelous error!—on a bicycle on the Silk Road instead?

Well hold your breath no more (er, until the spring of 2017 January 30, 2018), because I have just the book for you! I'm thrilled to share the news that Knopf Canada will publish "Lands of Lost Borders," a travel memoir based on my and Melissa Yule's Cycling Silk expedition. Can't wait to share this mad, wondrous adventure with you all in words. Now I just have to finish writing them. So if I'm a total recluse for the next year or so, you'll know why...

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AuthorKate Harris
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Writing. Such an odd, solitary, snail-paced way to engage with the world, or live trying. At the Brooklyn Book Festival I went to this past weekend, one panelist described writing as "hellish good fun." Elif Batuman, another panelist (and a nonfiction writer I admire), recalled those scenes in "Sex and the City" in which Carrie, a writer, languidly completes her under-deadline column while eating ice cream in bed. "I mean, that's completely antithetical to the spirit of writing," said Batuman, only sort of joking. Panelist and legendary journalist Renata Adler, her signature braid slung over her shoulder, noted that the only reward a writer can ever hope for upon finishing a piece is "the calm good conscience of some limited achievement." Yes, indeed.

So when you wake up one morning to learn that your essay has been listed as a notable selection in Best American Travel Writing 2015, you know the achievement may be limited, but the ice cream is deserved. Big thanks once again to The Georgia Review for believing in (and publishing) my travel piece "Lands of Lost Borders," and to the Best American series for taking note of it. You can read the essay online, if you're so inclined, here.

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AuthorKate Harris

Well, I never imagined I'd someday appear in the pages of VOGUE––in Germany no less! I'm profiled in VOGUE Germany's semi-annual special edition on "Business" (October 2014) as part of a feature about Wings WorldQuest, an amazing organization that supports women in exploration. Please "like" Wings Worldquest on Facebook, and if you can read German, check out VOGUE on European newsstands now...and let me know what I've said!!

Kate Harris in German Vogue
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AuthorKate Harris